Wrestler-turned-Doc speaks at Soin


By John Bombatch - jbombatch@aimmediamidwest.com



A varied crowd of wrestlers, coaches, youth and parents was on hand to hear Dr. Kyle Ott give a seminar on wrestling injuries, Nov. 16 at the Soin Medical Center in Beavercreek. Ott is a three-time former Ohio high school champion during his career at Wayne and Graham, and a two-time NCAA runner up and a college All-American while at Illinois.


John Bombatch | Greene County News

Area high school coaches and wrestlers look over a slide presentation given by All-American wrestler-turned non-surgical sports medicine doctor Kyle Ott, Nov. 16 at the Soin Medical Center in Beavercreek.


John Bombatch | Greene County News

Three-time Ohio high school wrestling champion, two-time NCAA national finalist and college wrestling All-American Dr. Kyle Ott gave a seminar on wrestling injuries, Nov. 16 at the Soin Medical Center in Beavercreek.


John Bombatch | Greene County News

BEAVERCREEK — Who better to talk about the myriad ways of getting injured in competitive wrestling than an All-American who is now a doctor, right?

A conference room full of area coaches, high school wrestlers, parents and youth agreed, Nov. 16, as they listened to Dr. Kyle Ott describe wrestling injuries and conditions in a presentation he titled “Embrace The Grind.”

A three-time Ohio high school wrestling champ while at Wayne and Graham High, and a college wrestling All-American and two-time NCAA runner up while at the University of Illinois, Ott was at the Soin Medical Center to give a one-hour talk on a range of wrestling injuries and skin ailments, and how to recognize them, avoid them and heal them.

When discussing ringworm types, Ott recommended more extensive treatment for a wrestler who wants to get back to competing on the mat.

“According to a recent study, ringworm is the No. 3 skin infection that causes a loss of practice time for NCAA wrestlers. Tinea corporis, or the ringworm of the body, is due to a fungus. … You initially think it’s a bug bite, but it doesn’t go away. The next thing you know, there’s a tournament coming up and you’re trying to find mom’s makeup to put over it. I’ve never done that, though,” he deadpanned.

“And then there’s Tinea capitis, or ringworm of the head. … Actually, the textbook thing to do is to give the patient a little bit of a topical anti-fungal lotion for it. … I know that’s not good enough for wrestling. I typically add an oral antibiotic as well. … In this situation, sometimes there’s some ringworm popping up somewhere else that we’re not seeing. Wrestlers are exposed to so much, it’s good to hit it hard and hit it early to get it going away.”

He also encouraged everyone to visit the Ohio High School Athletic Association’s wrestling website, particularly the section on Wrestling Sports Medicine for specific guidelines on treating skin ailments.

Ott also discussed a new treatment for cartilage and joint injuries called Platelet Rich Plasma (or PRP) Therapy. The new procedure provides a way of extracting healthy blood platelets from a patient and then injecting a healthy concentration of those platelets into the area that needs healing. According to Ott, more than 700 studies have been done on the procedure. Doctors are finding that it works particularly well for joint injuries.

Beavercreek coach Gary Wise was on hand and was impressed with the findings.

“That injection therapy, I’d just heard about that about a month ago,” Wise said. “It’s nice that they’re finding ways to fight injuries, and in a way that’s not drug related. It’s coming from your own body. That’s pretty wild.”

Wise said the presentation was well worth his time, as well as that of the wrestlers who attended. Ott touched on skin issues like impetigo, forms of ringworm and other various skin maladies. He also discussed joint injuries, particularly knee and shoulder injuries.

“Most of the injuries I’ve seen locally are pretty minor. But I would say knees, and some shoulder injuries, somewhat. I’ve seen more knee injuries than shoulders, though. But as he mentioned, the skin is a big issue,” Wise said. “We try to do our own preventative things. We have long-sleeve shirts for practice, to try to cut down on the skin-to-skin contact. It’s a big issue, and I think most coaches are very diligent about that.”

Ott, who specializes in Non-surgical Sports Medicine, is currently accepting patients at the Orthopedic Institute of Dayton.

Across Ohio, the first day of high school wrestling practice took place on Nov. 10. The 2017-‘18 Ohio high school wrestling

season officially begins on Friday, Dec. 1.

A varied crowd of wrestlers, coaches, youth and parents was on hand to hear Dr. Kyle Ott give a seminar on wrestling injuries, Nov. 16 at the Soin Medical Center in Beavercreek. Ott is a three-time former Ohio high school champion during his career at Wayne and Graham, and a two-time NCAA runner up and a college All-American while at Illinois.
http://www.beavercreeknewscurrent.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/49/2017/11/web1_Crowd.jpgA varied crowd of wrestlers, coaches, youth and parents was on hand to hear Dr. Kyle Ott give a seminar on wrestling injuries, Nov. 16 at the Soin Medical Center in Beavercreek. Ott is a three-time former Ohio high school champion during his career at Wayne and Graham, and a two-time NCAA runner up and a college All-American while at Illinois. John Bombatch | Greene County News

Area high school coaches and wrestlers look over a slide presentation given by All-American wrestler-turned non-surgical sports medicine doctor Kyle Ott, Nov. 16 at the Soin Medical Center in Beavercreek.
http://www.beavercreeknewscurrent.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/49/2017/11/web1_KneeChart.jpgArea high school coaches and wrestlers look over a slide presentation given by All-American wrestler-turned non-surgical sports medicine doctor Kyle Ott, Nov. 16 at the Soin Medical Center in Beavercreek. John Bombatch | Greene County News

Three-time Ohio high school wrestling champion, two-time NCAA national finalist and college wrestling All-American Dr. Kyle Ott gave a seminar on wrestling injuries, Nov. 16 at the Soin Medical Center in Beavercreek.
http://www.beavercreeknewscurrent.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/49/2017/11/web1_KyleOttMic.jpgThree-time Ohio high school wrestling champion, two-time NCAA national finalist and college wrestling All-American Dr. Kyle Ott gave a seminar on wrestling injuries, Nov. 16 at the Soin Medical Center in Beavercreek. John Bombatch | Greene County News

By John Bombatch

jbombatch@aimmediamidwest.com

Contact John Bombatch at 937-372-444, Ext. 2123. You can reach Dr. Kyle Ott at 937-298-4417.

Contact John Bombatch at 937-372-444, Ext. 2123. You can reach Dr. Kyle Ott at 937-298-4417.