Crisis intervention team training


Submitted photos Law enforcement officials celebrated the training’s conclusion at a graduate ceremony.

Submitted photos Law enforcement officials celebrated the training’s conclusion at a graduate ceremony.


CIT Officer of the Year awards were given to Officer Jolene Irons of the Clark County Sheriff’s Office, and Corporal Jeff Beam of the Yellow Springs Police Department for their exceptional service.


YELLOW SPRINGS — The Mental Health & Recovery Board of Clark, Greene & Madison Counties (MHRB) delivered a five-day, 40-hour intensive Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) training to 35 mental health, social service, and law enforcement professionals from the three-county region at Antioch Midwest University.

CIT is an internationally recognized best practice for law enforcement as they respond to crisis situations involving individuals in the community living with a mental illness. Throughout the week, participants learned about topics such as forensic monitoring, de-escalation, psychiatric medications, trauma, and voluntary and involuntary hospitalization and client rights, while also participating in interactive hallucination simulations and role plays.

Participants, their guests, and law enforcement officials celebrated the training’s conclusion at a graduate ceremony Sept. 28. Springfield Police Department’s Chief Lee Graf acted as Master of Ceremonies, and Fairborn Municipal Court’s Judge Beth W. Cappelli, who runs the only Supreme Court-certified drug court in the region, served as keynote speaker.

During the ceremony, CIT Officer of the Year awards were given to Officer Jolene Irons of the Clark County Sheriff’s Office, and Corporal Jeff Beam of the Yellow Springs Police Department for their exceptional service.

“These officers were nominated by colleagues, carefully considered the planning committee and chosen because they have embraced the basic principles of CIT. They exemplify CIT traits by fostering collaboration, showing compassion to assist those affected by mental illness, they work to understand mental illness and reduce stigma, and have consistently applied the characteristics when interacting with individuals impacted by mental illness,” said Tracey Stute, director of prevention, treatment, and supports at MHRB.

MHRB has offered CIT training since 2005, making this year’s training its 13th annual event.

Submitted photos Law enforcement officials celebrated the training’s conclusion at a graduate ceremony.
https://www.beavercreeknewscurrent.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/49/2018/10/web1_Crisis1.jpgSubmitted photos Law enforcement officials celebrated the training’s conclusion at a graduate ceremony.

CIT Officer of the Year awards were given to Officer Jolene Irons of the Clark County Sheriff’s Office, and Corporal Jeff Beam of the Yellow Springs Police Department for their exceptional service.
https://www.beavercreeknewscurrent.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/49/2018/10/web1_Crisis2.jpgCIT Officer of the Year awards were given to Officer Jolene Irons of the Clark County Sheriff’s Office, and Corporal Jeff Beam of the Yellow Springs Police Department for their exceptional service.