TAC gets increase in government contract


News-Current Report



Kevin Byrd helps manufacture a U.S. Air Force cargo net.


Submitted photos Senior Airman Matthew Hunter and Tech. Sgt. Jonnedi Paule, 19th Movement Control Team aerial porters, heft a “tricon” shipping container into a C-130 Hercules cargo plane at Forward Operating Base Salerno, Khost province, Afghanistan. The cargo net was manufactured by TAC.


XENIA — TAC Industries, Inc., which has a cargo repair facility in Xenia, has been issued a significant increase to a previous government contract for the manufacture of aircraft cargo nets.

The modification details a need for an additional 148,000 cargo nets shipped to the U.S. Air Force by March 2019. Production at the Springfield facilities will increase from about 3,000 nets per month to an average of 7,000 cargo nets per month.

“We’re very happy to see this upward trend of cargo net orders,” said CEO Mary Brandstetter.

An increase means continued and assured employment to the dozens of people with disabilities who work in the new net area of the TAC production facility. The increase in the contract also means that TAC is exploring a number of ways to meet the increased demand, including possibly hiring 10-12 people in the coming year. TAC — also known as The Abilities Connection — anticipates a need for both people with disabilities and typical people to meet this demand.

TAC is a unique nonprofit facility in Clark County with a long history of providing employment, training, and care for people with disabilities

The agency has repaired cargo nets for the U.S. Air Force for decades. TAC began manufacturing new cargo nets in 2005, and it is now the proud sole source supplier of new nets to the U.S. Air Force. The top and side nets are manufactured at the Old Selma Road (Springfield) and Progress Drive (Xenia) facilities. They secure both military and humanitarian aid cargo on pallets during shipment. Individuals with disabilities who choose to work in the production areas of TAC earn a paycheck, self-esteem, and pride in a job well done.

Kevin Byrd helps manufacture a U.S. Air Force cargo net.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/49/2017/05/web1_Kevin-Byrd-Sewing.jpgKevin Byrd helps manufacture a U.S. Air Force cargo net.

Submitted photos Senior Airman Matthew Hunter and Tech. Sgt. Jonnedi Paule, 19th Movement Control Team aerial porters, heft a “tricon” shipping container into a C-130 Hercules cargo plane at Forward Operating Base Salerno, Khost province, Afghanistan. The cargo net was manufactured by TAC.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/49/2017/05/web1_TAC-cargo-nets-in-use.jpgSubmitted photos Senior Airman Matthew Hunter and Tech. Sgt. Jonnedi Paule, 19th Movement Control Team aerial porters, heft a “tricon” shipping container into a C-130 Hercules cargo plane at Forward Operating Base Salerno, Khost province, Afghanistan. The cargo net was manufactured by TAC.

News-Current Report

Xenia Daily Gazette news report compiled by Scott Halasz.

Xenia Daily Gazette news report compiled by Scott Halasz.